15-11-2021
7 PM CET
Stream 8/8
Stream 8/8

(re)programming: Accountability
How to tell With Eyal Weizman

15-11-2021
7 PM CET

Truth is hardly making it under an information ecosystem defined by speed, exploitation, opacity and inequality. But journalism is not in danger, it is just happening somewhere else. Eyal Weizman founded Forensic Architecture to test a methodology for analyzing the occupation of Gaza as a crime scene, using buildings as witnesses, satellite data as evidence and models and artificial intelligence as tools for the testing and verification of new hypotheses. This exercise of counter-forensics has been replicated and improved over the years to provide new evidence against official narratives in international human rights courts. It also prompted a new genre of journalistic procedurals and a community of practice that, under the moniker Investigative Commons, seeks to confront the disinformation machine of “counter-factual” neo-fascist groups by socializing the development and deployment of “counter-forensic” evidence. Initiated by Forensic Architecture, FORENSIS and the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR), Investigative Commons includes documentary superstar Laura Poitras/Praxis Films, Bellingcat, Mnemonic and HKW, among others.

Eyal Weizman is the founding director of Forensic Architecture and Professor of Spatial and Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of over 15 books, he has held positions in many universities worldwide including Princeton, ETH Zurich and the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. He is a member of the Technology Advisory Board of the International Criminal Court and the Centre for Investigative Journalism. In 2019 he was elected life fellow of the British Academy and appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2020 New Year Honours for services to architecture. In 2020 he was elected the Richard von Weizsäcker fellow at the Bosch Academy. Eyal studied architecture at the Architectural Association, graduating in 1998. He received his PhD in 2006 from the London Consortium at Birkbeck, University of London.

Photo: Paul Stuart for New Scientist

18-10-2021
7 PM CET
Stream 7/8
Stream 7/8

(re)programming: Community
Talk to Your Neighbours With Astra Taylor

18-10-2021
7 PM CET

How can we have collective action in the age of extreme polarization, isolation, dehumanization and dystopian imagination? What can we build from the ashes of the Arab Spring, the Indignados movement and Occupy Wall Street? A relentless organizer, Astra Taylor knows the perfect social movement simply doesn’t exist, but in a series of legendary attempts to improve the existing ones she has become one of the essential chroniclers of contemporary acts of collective resistance. Ever since publishing Occupy!, a “semi-regular, forty-page tabloid newspaper inspired by the Occupy movement”, she has been engaged in a lifelong debate about the nature of community-driven power, pushing its limits and analyzing its discontents. We will look at the promises of human alliances against the invisible powers of technocratic regimes.

Astra Taylor is an international filmmaker, writer, and political organizer. She directed the philosophical documentaries What Is Democracy? (TIFF 2018), Examined Life (TIFF 2008), and Zizek! (TIFF 2005). She wrote American Book Award winner The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age and Democracy May Not Exist, but We’ll Miss It When It’s Gone, now out from Metropolitan Books. She is also the co-founder of the Debt Collective, a debtors’ union organizing to renegotiate and resist our debts and defend millions of northamerican households. She writes for The New York Times, The London Review of Books, The Guardian, The Walrus, The Baffler, n+1, and many other outlets. She is a former Shuttleworth Foundation Fellow and a former touring member of the band Neutral Milk Hotel.

Special guests:

Tjaša Pureber is a performing arts producer, activist and social movement researcher who is currently working on her PhD research on knowledge production, social organisation and participatory art.

Barbara Rajgelj is an assistant professor and researcher at the Faculty of Social Sciences, a human rights activist and co-creator of the Pritličje café and cultural centre in Ljubljana.

Asja Hrvatin is a social worker, youth writer and activist for the rights of refugees, especially refugee women (No Border Craft collective), and for the rights of victims of capitalism, such as precarious workers and the homeless (15o movement).

20-09-2021
7 PM CET
Stream 6/8
Stream 6/8

(re)programming: The Cloud
Everything Is Not Connected With Joana Moll

20-09-2021
7 PM CET

Digital platforms have made a business out of removing us from our real communities and replacing them with a controlled simulation of connection that only exists as a directory in a massive server commonly regarded as The Cloud. Algorithmically created out of similar tastes, pet hates and grievances, it is designed as a data extraction machine and a container for targeted advertising, gamified to maximize the anticipated user’s compulsion and company’s profit. Its phenomenal effectiveness has not only detached us from our natural habitats, it is also actively destroying them. Joana Moll studies the real environmental and social impact of The Cloud and the data extraction industry, calculating the amount of CO2 the Cloud burps into the atmosphere every time we lazy-Google the name of an actor or the amount of freedom we give away everytime we swipe left on a Tinder offer.

Joana Moll is a Barcelona/Berlin based artist and researcher. Her work critically explores the way techno-capitalist narratives affect the alphabetization of machines, humans and ecosystems. Her main research topics include Internet materiality, surveillance, social profiling and interfaces. She has presented her work in renowned institutions, museums, universities and festivals around the world, such as the Venice Biennale, MAXXI, MMOMA, Laboral, CCCB, ZKM, Bozar, The Natural History Museum in Berlin, Austrian Museum of Applied Arts (MAK), Ars Electronica, HEK, Photographer’s Gallery, Korean Cultural Foundation Center, Chronus Art Center, New York University, Georgetown University, Rutgers University, University of Cambridge, Goldsmiths University of London, University of Illinois, Concordia University, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, ETH Zürich, École d’Art d’Aix en Provence, British Computer Society, The New School, CPDP 2019, Transmediale, FILE and ISEA among many others. She is the co-founder of the Critical Interface Politics Research Group at HANGAR [Barcelona] and co-founder of The Institute for the Advancement of Popular Automatisms. She is currently a visiting lecturer at Universität Potsdam and Escola Elisava.

Special guests:

Dušan Caf has in-depth experience in technology and public policy. He is the director of the Digitas Institute for better digital accessibility, and the founder of the Digital Society Forum, a think-tank for solutions on key policy, regulatory and governance issues in the digital society.

Luka Frelih is an artist, programmer and hacker with a particular affinity for free software. He is a member of Ljudmila — Ljubljana Digital Media Lab since its foundation in 1994.

Filip Muki Dobranić is a debater, hacker, philosopher, sociologist of culture and social media theorist. He co-founded Today is a new day, the institute for other studies where he’s responsible for hacking and <3.

21-06-2021
12 noon CET
Stream 5/8
Stream 5/8

(re)programming: AI
Better Machines for Better Humans With Kate Crawford

21-06-2021
12 noon CET

Kate has travelled the planet, visiting the sites that reveal the true costs of artificial intelligence as an extractive industry, consuming natural resources, labour and vast quantities of data. In the process, she has also imagined better ways of building and deploying those technical tools in ways that empower people to improve their lives and communities.

Kate Crawford is a leading scholar of the social implications of artificial intelligence. Her work focuses on understanding large-scale data systems in the wider contexts of history, politics, labor, and the environment. She is a Research Professor at USC Annenberg, a Senior Principal Researcher at MSR-NYC, and she currently holds the inaugural Visiting Chair for AI and Justice at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. Kate’s work also includes collaborative projects and visual investigations. Her project Anatomy of an AI System with Vladan Joler won the Beazley Design of the Year Award, and is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Her collaboration with the artist Trevor Paglen produced Training Humans – the first major exhibition of the images used to train AI systems. Their investigative essay, Excavating AI, won the Ayrton Prize from the British Society for the History of Science. Crawford’s latest book, ATLAS OF AI: Power, Politics, and the Planetary Costs of Artificial Intelligenc, was published by Yale University Press this month, and has been described as “timely and urgent” by Science.

Special guests:

Sanela Jahić is an intermedia artist who, through technological tools and often in cooperation with experts in mechanical engineering, automation, software and electronics, constructs visual and technologically supported kinetic objects and installations that problematize society and individuals in it.

Lenart J. Kučić is a journalist and podcaster at investigative medium Pod črto, editor of podcasting network Marsowci, and co-editor of Disenz magazine. He follows the trends in telecommunications and information technologies (IT) and tracks the changes brought about by the convergence of the communication and media industries. He is the author and co-author of several books, expert articles and studies on the topics of media ownership and new media.

Nika Mahnič is a researcher of the digital condition(ality), and a PhD student in Politics at Queen Mary University in London focusing on proprietary analytics and automated decision-making systems in the UK public administration. They are a co-curator of Grounded festival of electronic music, critical thinking and activism.

 

 

Attendance is free of charge. No registration required.

10-05-2021
7 PM CET
Stream 4/8
Stream 4/8

(re)programming: Interdependence
Post-Human Politics With Anab Jain

10-05-2021
7 PM CET

Anab Jain’s work transports people into the future. The evolving installation Mitigation of Shock by her studio Superflux imagines a random apartment in the London of 2050, or in a Singapore that has become a flooded city in 2219. Both are equipped with an array of DIY interventions, hydroponic farms and other tools for gathering, capturing and storing both food and water under new climate regimes. While their technical solutions are fascinating (and actually work), it is the vision that prevails: we not only survive but also thrive, as we adapt and become smarter, stronger, fitter and better acquainted with other members of the planetary society. We tell ourselves stories in order to live, but we can realise better ones.

Anab Jain is a designer, an artist and a filmmaker. She is a co-founder and Director of Superflux, a speculative design studio based in London that explores the intersections of climate crisis, technology and more-than-human politics. Along with her partner Jon Ardern, she has produced critically acclaimed films, art and installations projecting the many possible futures for humankind. She is also a teacher in the Design Investigations programme at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna.

Anab has worked for some of the world’s biggest firms like Microsoft Research, Sony, Samsung and Nokia, as well as institutions like the Government of the UAE, Innovate UK, Cabinet Office UK, UNDP, Future Cities Catapult and Forum for the Future. She has exhibited work at MoMA New York, the National Museum of China and the V&A in London. She has earned honours from Apple Computers Inc., UNESCO, Geneva Human Rights Festival and TED.

Special guests:

Saša Spačal is a post-media artist working at the intersection of research into living systems, contemporary and sound art.

Anja Planišček is an associate professor at Ljubljana’s Faculty of Architecture and a practicing architect. Her focus is architecture of social engagement, international development cooperation and humanitarian aid, housing politics, socialization and promotion of architecture, Slovenian architecture in the period of socialism.

Špela Petrič is a new media artist and former scientific researcher. Her practice is a composite of natural sciences, wet media and performance. Much of her recent work has focused on plant life.

Attendance is free of charge. No registration required.

19-04-2021
7 PM CET
Stream 3/8
Stream 3/8

(re)programming: Energy
Can We Repair the Climate? With Holly Jean Buck

19-04-2021
7 PM CET

Holly Jean Buck knows we have the tech to restore the earth and repair the climate. In After Geoengineering she takes a deep dive into the envisioning, development, and deployment of tactics and schemes for deliberately intervening in the environment, including Solar Radiation Management (SRM) and Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), with a useful best and worst-case scenarios perspective. Most importantly, she takes a holistic, integrated appreciation of ecological systems, proposing the new social formations needed to implement them, tackle mitigation and manage schemes that acknowledge the differential vulnerability for rural, impoverished and indigenous populations.

Holly Jean Buck is an assistant professor in the Department of Environment and Sustainability at State University of New York at Buffalo. She is interested in how communities can be involved in the design of emerging environmental technologies. She works at the interface of environmental sociology, international development, and science and technology studies. Her diverse research interests include agroecology and carbon farming, new energy technologies, artificial intelligence, and the restoration of California’s Salton Sea.

Her book After Geoengineering: Climate Tragedy, Repair, and Restoration examines best-case scenarios for carbon removal. Most recently, she was the co-editor of Has It Come to This? The Promises and Perils of Geoengineering on the Brink, a Rutgers University Press volume where thinkers, scholars and activists ranging from sociology and geography to ethics and Indigenous studies examine the chances for democratic climate governance.

👉 https://www.geo.design

Special guests:

Rok Kranjc is a sustainability transitions researcher, translator and editor, education organizer, process designer, radio journalist and climate activist.

Senka Šifkovič Vrbica is a lawyer with a master’s degree in social anthropology, who has been working exclusively in the fields of legal protection of the environment and spatial planning for many years, focusing also on solving systemic problems.

Borut Tavčar is a journalist for the newspaper Delo. He has been dealing with environmental issues for 30 years, and with climate change since 1996.

Attendance is free of charge. No registration required.

15-03-2021
7 PM CET
Stream 2/8
Stream 2/8

(re)programming: Infrastructure
An Alternative Earth With Benjamin Bratton

15-03-2021
7 PM CET

We are in a hurry; even 2030 might be too late. We need to fundamentally transform our cities, technologies and ecosystems to ensure our planet keeps supporting earth-like life. But what does that look like? Our apocalyptic, post-colonial fantasies obscure our vision. We dream of thriving under the impossible conditions of distant planets but fail to imagine establishing better ones on earth. In The Stack, Benjamin Bratton envisioned a model for a planetary scale computation, then used it as a tool for a new planetary redesign project, the Terraforming – not of Mars but of Earth. We will discuss the technical, social and political infrastructures that are required for such a project. “A task of preventing one future,” he writes, “so that another might, with luck, instead come to pass”.

Benjamin Bratton is the director of the design research program and think tank called The Terraforming at the Strelka Institute of Media, Architecture and Design in Moscow. He is also a professor of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego, and teaches Digital Design at The European Graduate School in Switzerland and is Visiting Faculty at the Southern California Institute of Architecture in Los Angeles.

His book The Stack: On Software and Sovereignty outlines a new geopolitical theory for the age of global computation and algorithmic governance. It was followed by The New Normal and The Terraforming, the thought catalogues for his first two research programs at Strelka. His most recent book is The Revenge of the Real: Politics for a Post-Pandemic World.

Special guests:

Marko Bauer is a translator, writer and editor. His translation of Bratton’s The Terraforming was recently published, introducing a new book series Exits at Sophia, which he co-edits.

Miloš Kosec is an architect and researcher. He focuses on issues of architect activity and passivity in modern society. He is the author of Ruins as an Architectural Object and, in addition to architectural and artistic practice, he also writes and edits within Nonument Group and the magazine Outsider.

Miha Turšič is an artist, designer and researcher dedicated to the development of arts and humanities in outer space.

Attendance is free of charge. No registration required.

15-02-2021
7 PM CET
Stream 1/8
Stream 1/8

(re)programming: Trigger
What Does it Take to Change the Future? With Kim Stanley Robinson

15-02-2021
7 PM CET

The Ministry for the Future (2020), the latest novel by Kim Stanley Robinson, departs from a scientific premise: as countries keep ignoring the Paris Agreement, our planet will keep getting hotter, all the way to the human boiling point. When India is hit by a devastating heatwave, killing millions, a climate response begins to take shape. In his most bleak yet hopeful work to date, Robinson explores the limits and possibilities of human cooperation under extreme circumstances. In this TRIGGER themed conversation, we will discuss what could be the wake-up call for rethinking our place as humans on the only planet we have, and the promising tools he discovered during his years of research.

Kim Stanley Robinson is the most beloved science fiction writer alive today. The Mars trilogy, his first international bestseller, published between 1992 and 1996, was an ambitious exploration of the terraforming of the Red planet that included an exercise on comparative space politics and their impact on the survival of the human race. This commitment to exploring climate crisis management and mitigation has turned him into the leading exponent of Climate Fiction, a genre that takes place in the world as we know it or in its near future.

A prolific writer, KSR’s most popular titles include New York 2140, Aurora, Shaman and Green Earth. He also wrote 2312, the first book to be nominated for all seven of the major science fiction awards and the winner of the prestigious Nebula Award for Best Novel in 2013. His most recent novel, The Ministry for the Future, published during the pandemic, is a brutal depiction of what it would take for humans to finally face the monstrous side effects of the Anthropocene.

👉 https://www.kimstanleyrobinson.info

Special guests:

Dr Lučka Kajfež Bogataj is a Slovenian climatologist and a pioneer in researching the impact of climate change. She has been recognized amongst women who inspire Europe and is, as a member of IPCC, a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Dr. Luka Omladič is a philosopher, environmentalist and environmental analyst who researches and writes on the topics of bioethics and environmental ethics. He is a member of the World Commission for Ethics in Science and Technology COMEST at UNESCO.

Ida Hiršenfelder (beepblip) is a sound artist and archivist. She lives in Ljubljana and works at the Museum of Contemporary Art Metelkova.

Attendance is free of charge. No registration required.