The Whole Internet

Olia Lialina

TUE, 29 May 2018
Moderna galerija, Ljubljana

In this talk Olia Lialina discusses the most important elements of the web from the mid ’90s and exposes the relationship between a new medium and its first users. The web of the mid ’90s was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction. Today this relationship has dissipated as the Internet became a mass medium to accommodate dotcom ambitions, professional authoring tools and usability guidelines. Olia Lialina’s talk deals with the choices web masters of pre-social networks had to make in their work before web design became a profession, and about her choices today, being a designer, a passionate researcher of the vernacular web, and a keeper of the One Terabyte of Kilobyte Age archive. In her highly illustrated talk the artist introduced to the audience pearls of the early web culture, going much deeper than usual ‘Under Construction’ signs and animated GIFs nostalgia.

Related event: The Whole Internet

Hacking Politics with Subversion, Civil Disobedience and Law

The Peng! Collective

WED 25 April 2018
Kino Šiška Centre for Urban Culture, Ljubljana

Peng’s art functions as a burning barricade in the media biosphere. What are the challenges to this position when working across national boundaries? Something apparently edgy in Germany might be illegal in Poland or the UK. In Europe, freedom of art is of greatest importance; in the US, freedom of speech. In the midst of questions of left-wing censorship and right-wing subversion, Peng share their tactics for disrupting both sides of the debate.

Related event: Tactics & Practice #6: Transnationalisms

steɪt əv nəʊlænd [State of Noland]

Denis Maksimov

WED, 25 April 2018
Kino Šiška Centre for Urban Culture, Ljubljana

The nation state is a modern fiction: a result of the conceptual intercourse between a sovereign introduced by Thomas Hobbes in “Leviathan” and the imperialist and nationalist ideologies of the nineteenth century. Despite all the criticism of it, it is approached as a fundamental component of the political order, an everlasting tabula rasa for (re)structuring power. We suggest an alternative ideology for political self-organisation: steɪt əv nəʊlænd [State of Noland]: a ‘state of mind’ of not aligning with any geopolitical entity and a ‘state-after-state’ as a constellation of practices that functionally replace nation-state monopoly.

Related event: Tactics & Practice #6: Transnationalisms

Performing States

Eleanor Saitta

WED 25 April 2018
Kino Šiška Centre for Urban Culture, Ljubljana

We have built our concept of the nation on the ideas of institutions, of fixed points on maps, in time, and in law.  We’re also somewhat aware that this is fiction? Here, we’ll explore how we might re-understand what we call a “nation”.

Related event: Tactics & Practice #6: Transnationalisms

Italian Limes: Mapping the Shifting Border across Alpine Glaciers

Marco Ferrari

TUE, 24 April 2018
Kino Šiška Centre for Urban Culture, Ljubljana

The border between Italy and its adjacent countries traverses snowfields and perennial ice sheets at high altitudes, mostly following the path of the Alpine watershed. Due to the global warming–induced shrinkage of the glaciers, a substantial shift of the watershed line has been detected in several places. Between 2014 and 2016, the project team of Studio Folder installed a network of custom-made, open-source sensors on a small section of the Austrian–Italian border on the Similaun glacier, to transmit in real time the position of the line. Marco Ferrari will talk about the genesis of the project and the fieldwork done in the Alps; he will also present the ongoing research on the history of Italian border surveys, along with a glimpse over other projects of Studio Folder that aim to develop a similar methodology of inquiry within the field of cartographic representation.

Related event: Tactics & Practice #6: Transnationalisms

Reclaiming Humanity: The Utopias of World Citizenship

Mojca Pajnik

TUE, 24 April 2018
Kino Šiška Centre for Urban Culture, Ljubljana

The transnational reality of living in contemporary global societies poses several challenges for contemporary societies. The prioritization of western nation-state membership and economic imperatives has produced second-class citizenships, while the inhumanity of managing migration by reintroducing border regimes and prioritizing fake security has robbed millions of individuals of their humanity, and fed populist rage against migrants. World citizenship, based on more than the nation state, might assume an interplay of institutional policy with non-institutional practices of various subjectivities, constituting the public. Reclaiming humanity against “the globalization of indifference” requires a utopian invention of “worldliness of people” that stands for a political project of equality, rather than the moral project of the defence of traditions.

Related event: Tactics & Practice #6: Transnationalisms

The Real Name Game

James Bridle

TUE, 24 April 2018
Kino Šiška Centre for Urban Culture, Ljubljana

New technologies are allowing new forms of identity and community to flourish and be recognised, from virtual citizenships to digital nations, and gender identities to non-human actors. At the same time, systems of power and governance attempt to corral and suppress identity within geographical borders and database schema. James Bridle explores the uses and abuses of identity in his own practice, and the work of others.

Related event: Tactics & Practice #6: Transnationalisms

Digital Money for All! The Politics and Aesthetics of Internet Revenue Models

Geert Lovink

TUE, 17 April 2018
Poligon Creative Centre, Ljubljana

MoneyLab is a network of artists, activists, geeks and researchers established in 2013 by the Amsterdam-based Institute of Network Cultures. It asks a simple question: How are artists or content producers, which really includes everyone, going to make a living from their work in the 21st century? According to Silicon Valley, we aren’t – we are going to be forced to give all creative products away for free, in exchange for “attention” on social media (while Facebook and Google make billions through ads and selling your private data). In response to the 2008 global financial crisis, “crypto currencies” (such as Bitcoin) arose to bypass both banks and tech giants. Money is exchanged via mobile phones. We join crowdfunding campaigns and experiment (again) with subscription-based services. What is the politics behind all these new services? How do artists relate to these new network architectures? How should we read the current hype? Are these services really decentralized as they claim? How many of us can read the rightwing libertarian values inside the digital money protocols? Who are the new power players? Let us join the debate. Money has been digital for decades. It is now becoming inseparable from the internet. If neither Wall St. nor Silicon Valley will be the winner of this game, then who will?

Related event: Crypto Design

Cellout.me

Jeroen van Loon

WED, 21 March 2018
Aksioma | Project Space, Ljubljana

In this talk, Joroen van Loon gave a brief general introduction to his work and then focus on the Cellout.me project which revolves around the idea of selling the artist’s DNA data to the highest bidder through an online auction. Van Loon explained why this idea is relevant to today’s data-driven society, and what kind of fundamental questions it poses to privacy, data authorship, big data and authenticity.

Related event: Cellout.me

Cryptographic Collectibles: the Materiality of Cryptography

Tim Brouwer

TUE, 6 March 2018
ALUO – Department for Visual Communication, Ljubljana

Whether it’s electronic money, tokenized assets or identities on the blockchain – digital wealth is gradually becoming a prominent part of our reality. As a result, the importance of cryptographic technologies is increasing. However, do we really understand those technologies? How do cryptographic technologies provide, secure and display wealth? The current, rather technical, depiction of contemporary cryptography omits those who aren’t literate in code writing. Therefore, its significance and scope aren’t entirely visible and cryptography remains in its crypt. Tim Brouwer believes that cryptography can be reimagined through the medium of product design. During his presentation, he will demonstrate the manner in which cryptographic technologies (from ‘Cryptographic Collectibles’ to futuristic bio-cryptography) manifest itself in our material reality.

Related event: Crypto Design

A Guided Tour Through the Clear, Deep and Dark Web

Anthony van der Meer

TUE, 6 March 2018
ALUO – Department for Visual Communication, Ljubljana

What’s the clearnet? What is the difference between the deep web and the dark web? And how do we find something that wasn’t supposed to be found? In this interactive talk all these questions will be answered. We meet on the clearnet where you learn how to easily find what you’re looking for and what you weren’t supposed to find. Then we will gradually find our way into more hidden parts of the web where we will discover the size and possibilities of the deep web and get to know around this huge online world. Our last stop? The dark web! Is it really such a bad place as the name implies? Or does it have a good reason for existence? You will be provided with tips and tricks to find out yourself. The tour will provide a practical “itinerary” but will also zoom in on the importance of having places to hide.

Related event: Crypto Design

Masks and Camouflage as Artistic Cryptographic Strategies

Patricia de Vries

TUE, 6 March 2018
ALUO – Department for Visual Communication, Ljubljana

Over the past years, a growing number of artists have formulated a critique over the ubiquity of identity recognition technologies. Specifically, the use of these technologies by state security programs, tech-giants and multinational corporations has met with opposition and controversy. A popular artistic form of resistance to recognition technology is sought in cryptographic masks. Zach Blas, Leo Selvaggio, Sterling Crispin and Adam Harvey are among a group of internationally acclaimed artists who have developed subversive anti-facial recognition crypto-masks that disrupt identification technologies. In this lecture, Patricia de Vries explores the ontological underpinnings of these popular and widely exhibited crypto-mask projects.

Related event: Crypto Design

Behind the Smart World

KairUS (Linda Kronman and Andreas Zingerle)

WED, 14 February 2018
Aksioma | Project Space, Ljubljana

Agbogbloshie is a district in the teeming metropolis of Accra in West-African Ghana. The world’s largest electronic-waste dump is located here. 22 hard-drives brought back to Austria from this dump were the starting point for the ‘Behind the Smart World’ Research Lab, a one year research program at servus.at in Linz, Austria. Alongside the material and exploitative dark sides of the dirty business with electronic waste, the ‘Behind the Smart World’ project brings together artistic positions dealing with the value of digital information and our constant production of data. During the artist talk at Aksioma Project Space KairUs will present the journey of the hard-drives, the creation of the ‘Forensic Fantasies’ trilogy and give insights to their current research project carried out at Woosong University in South Korea.

Related event: Forensic Fantasies

BURDEN

Movie screening / Slovenian premiere

Ticket: 5 € / 3 € (presale)

Trg prekomorskih brigad 3, Ljubljana, Slovenia

The New Collaborators | Reinventing Critical Art Practice

Ruth Catlow and Marc Garrett

WED, 11 January 2018
Aksioma | Project Space, Ljubljana

This lecture reflects on new practices, processes, collaborations and partners developed by Furtherfield with the curation of the exhibition New World Order and the publication of the blook Artists Re:Thinking the Blockchain. Classed by funders as a high-risk arts organisation because of the political topics and engagement with newly emerging techno-social conditions, Furtherfield constantly adopts new contexts and styles of dialogue across different practices and cultures: new media arts, fine art, permaculture, migration topics, critical engineering, start-up culture & hactivism, etc. Driven by issues of survival and artistic compulsion Furtherfield explores world contexts in relationship to local and international communities cannon breaking & category shifting.

Related event: New World Order

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